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Person writing in a notebook with cash money on the side

Grants for digital media in Latin America soar in three years and grow with pandemic, study says

According to the study by SembraMedia, in 2019, grants surpassed all other sources of financing and came to represent 29 percent of revenue from these media in the region. And, in 2020, they reached 37 percent.

ForoCAP: Carlos Dada at podium

Central American Journalism Forum held in midst of harassment and persecution of the region’s press

“I would like to see this forum as an opportunity to reflect on our situation, to start a conversation that leads us to face together, better organized and accompanied, the wave of orchestrated attacks on Central American journalism from each of our governments. Together, organized, we will better resist” said Carlos Dada at the Central American Journalism Forum.

Cuban flag

Journalists in Cuba are besieged, intimidated and watched to prevent them from covering the 15-N protests

Members of the press have faced extrajudicial house arrests, summons with authorities, suspension of services, withdrawal of accreditations and the presence of security agents near their homes since days before the 15-N protests.

Webinar panelists

Do more and better journalism to defend democracy amid authoritarian governments, webinar panelists say

Journalists from Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Venezuela spoke in a panel during the webinar “Journalism in Times of Polarization and Disinformation in Latin America.” The panel explored press freedom in countries faced with increasingly authoritarian governments and how they’ve been able to continue doing journalism.

FEATURED IMAGE Polarization Panel

Working together, sticking to the facts and verification are the best strategies for journalists targeted by polarization

Journalists who become targets in polarized societies must support each other, persevere in doing investigative journalism, and always check the information in their stories, concluded participants in the panel “Polarization: Challenges for Journalists who Become Targets in Polarized Societies,” which was part of the event “Journalism in Times of Polarization and Disinformation in Latin America.”

Binders of papers with a magnifying glass laying on top

Latin American journalists share tips for investigating health, crime, the environment and more at annual conference

Latin America is experiencing a “golden age of investigative reporting,” according to Colombian journalist María Teresa Ronderos. At the annual Global Investigative Journalism Conference (GIJC), reporters from the region shared tips and methodologies for investigating everything from COVID-19 to corruption.

José Rubén Zamora - Guatemala

‘In Guatemala, there are no institutional checks and balances,’ says journalist José Rubén Zamora after a recent denunciation of persecution

Guatemalan journalist José Rubén Zamora, director and founder of elPeriódico, publicly denounced what he said are actions of judicial harassment by the government against him and his media outlet due to their critical editorial line.

Disinformation panel speakers

Collaboration, technology and proximity to the public are weapons of Latin American journalists to fight disinformation

Betting on collaborative journalism, re-establishing a connection with the public, and incorporating the use of technology are among the effective measures presented by the panelists of “How journalism has reacted to waves of disinformation,” from the webinar “Journalism in Times of Polarization and Disinformation in Latin America."

Person passing out a paper in a favela

Community newspapers in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas fill information gaps, fight stereotypes to produce truly local journalism

Many journalists who live and work in Rio’s favelas work by the “nós por nós” (informally, Us, by Us) mantra, creating their own media initiatives with journalism by and for themselves. They do this in order to speak their own voice to their own people, those that traditional media –and the State – usually forgets. 

Covers of the KSJ science editing handbooks in English, Spanish and Portuguese

Brazilian version of KSJ’s handbook on science journalism editing is now available for free download from Knight Center

A new resource is available to Portuguese speaking journalists and editors seeking guidance on how to cover and question scientific topics. The Science Editing Handbook, originally published in English by the MIT’s Knight Science Journalism Program, is now available in a Brazilian edition, translated and adapted by a group of science journalists.

Cover of the Science Editing Handbook in Portuguese

Brazilian edition of science editing handbook for journalists will be launched during webinar

Brazilian journalists will now have an important resource for reporting and editing science journalism. On Friday, Nov. 5, the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas and the Serrapilheira Institute, of Brazil, will publish the Portuguese translation of the KSJ Science Editing Handbook during a special webinar.

Nicaraguan flag and election box

In year leading up to presidential elections, Nicaraguan government cracks down on independent press

In the year leading up to Nicaragua’s presidential election on Nov. 7, President Daniel Ortega implemented increasingly strict limitations on press freedom— a move critics say is part of a years-long campaign to silence Ortega’s political opposition.