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Silvia Higuera

Silvia A. Higuera Flórez is a Colombian journalist who has written for the Knight Center since 2012. She is interested in covering Latin American issues and human rights, especially the right to freedom of expression, and investigative journalism. She studied Social Communication and Journalism at Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana in Bucaramanga (Colombia), and received her Master's of Arts in Journalism from the University of Texas at Austin in 2015. She worked with the Office of the Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) under the Orlando Sierra fellowship during 2014. She also worked for the Colombian newspaper Vanguardia Liberal and wrote for different magazines about local, economic and public order issues. Her work has also appeared in The Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald of Miami. Email: silvia.knightcenter@gmail.com

Silvia A. Higuera Flórez es una periodista colombiana que trabaja para el Centro Knight desde el 2012. Su interés periodístico es América Latina y los derechos humanos, particularmente el derecho a la libertad de expresión, así como el periodismo de investigación. Estudió Comunicación Social – Periodismo en la Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana de Bucaramanga (Colombia), y recibió su maestría en Periodismo en la Universidad de Texas, en Austin en 2015. Trabajó para la Relatoría Especial para la Libertad de Expresión de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CIDH) en el marco de la beca Orlando Sierra, durante 2014. También hizo parte del diario Vanguardia Liberal y escribió para otras revistas colombianas cubriendo fuentes locales, económicas y judiciales. Algunos de sus trabajos han aparecido en The Miami Herald y El Nuevo Herald de Miami.

Silvia A. Higuera Flórez é uma jornalista colombiana e escreve para o Centro Knight desde 2012. Seu interesse jornalístico é a América Latina e os direitos humanos, nomeadamente o direito à liberdade de expressão. Estudou Comunicação Social – Jornalismo na Universidade Pontifícia Bolivariana de Bucaramanga, na Colômbia e completou seu mestrado em jornalismo na Universidade do Texas em Austin. Silvia trabalhou na Relatoria para a Liberdade de Expressão da CIDH pela bolsa Orlando Sierra, em 2014. Trabalhou para o jornal Vanguardia Liberal e escreveu para outras revistas colombianas cobrindo temas locais, econômicas e judiciárias. Alguns de seus trabalhos apareceram no The Miami Herald e no El Nuevo Herald de Miami.

Recent Articles

Nicaragua, El Salvador webinar

Journalism in Nicaragua and El Salvador: persistence amid government hostility

Carlos Fernando Chamorro, director of the magazine Confidencial in Nicaragua, and Carlos Dada, cofounder of El Faro in El Salvador, talked with María Teresa Ronderos, director for CLIP, about journalism in the face of hostile governments during the 13th Ibero-American Colloquium on Digital Journalism.

Panel Objectivity is Not Neutrality

Tom Rosenstiel: “If we think that our opinion has more moral integrity than genuine inquiry, then I fear we will be lost”

Tom Rosenstiel, executive director of the American Press Institute, gave his keynote presentation “Objectivity is Not Neutrality: What is the purpose of journalistic inquiry?” during the 21st International Symposium on Online Journalism (ISOJ) July 24.

Research panel

Researchers show that media is trying to change old power structures, but there is still much room for improvement

Keeping its tradition of bringing together scholars, journalists and media executives, on July 23 the 21st International Online Journalism Symposium (ISOJ) held its research panel “Power, privilege and patriarchy in journalism: Dynamics of media control, resistance and renewal” to discuss the results of peer-reviewed papers.

Maria Ressa

Holding the line and battling for the truth: journalist Maria Ressa from the Philippines explains the weaponization of social media during the first panel of ISOJ

During the first panel of ISOJ online 2020, Filipino-American journalist Maria Ressa explained how technology is affecting the democracy not only in the Philippines but around the world. She talked about the complex disinformation networks targeting journalists and freedom of expression.

Desinfodemia COVID 19

UNESCO published two reports in Spanish to understand and tackle disinformation about COVID-19

UNESCO published two policy reports in Spanish to understand and respond to the 'infodemic': the disinformation pandemic about COVID-19 that has circulated at a speed impossible to control. 

Jineth Bedoya Featured Image

'Journalists cannot lose track of the people to whom we have a responsibility': Jineth Bedoya

Awarding the 2020 UNESCO/Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize to Colombian journalist Jineth Bedoya Lima held special significance for the press in her home country.

Course on freedom of expression for judicial operators in the midst of the pandemic has 'important relevance'

The course "International Legal Framework for freedom of expression, access to public information and protection of journalists," which has already reached almost 10,000 judicial operators in the region, coincides this time with the crisis facing the world due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Applications will close on April 5.

Course on freedom of expression for judicial operators in Ibero-America opens applications for the 2020 edition

The 2020 edition of the course “International Legal Framework of freedom of expression, access to public information and protection of journalists” opens applications to all magistrates, judges and judicial operators in Ibero-America.

Lydia Cacho

Man convicted for torture of Mexican journalist Lydia Cacho will serve more than five years in prison

Juan Sánchez Moreno, who was commander of the Attorney General's Office of the state of Puebla, was convicted on Jan. 15 for the crime of torture against Mexican journalist Lydia Cacho, which occurred in 2005

wiretap

New reports of illegal espionage of journalists in Colombia reignite fears

Illegal espionage of journalists and other public personalities, including magistrates and politicians, seems to have another chapter in Colombia after almost a decade ago