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Katherine Pennacchio

Katherine Pennacchio is a Venezuelan journalist living in Spain. She has developed her career as part of media and non-governmental organizations. She co-founded Vendata.org, an innovative project for the liberation of information and publication of open data in Venezuela. She was also part of the team of the investigative journalism site, Armando.info, and of Runrun.es, where she participated in large-scale investigations such as the Panama Papers. Katherine has a master's degree in Investigative, Data and Visualization Journalism from the Editorial Unit and the Rey Juan Carlos University of Madrid and she is passionate about data analytics. She currently works as a freelancer and is part of the Association of Investigative Journalists of Spain.
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Katherine Pennacchio es una periodista venezolana viviendo en España. Ella ha desarrollado su trayectoria entre medios de comunicación y organizaciones no gubernamentales. Co-fundó Vendata.org, un proyecto innovador de liberación de información y publicación de datos abiertos en Venezuela. También fue parte del equipo del portal especializado en periodismo de investigación, Armando.info y de Runrun.es, donde participó en investigaciones de envergadura como los Papeles de Panamá. Katherine tiene una maestría en Periodismo de Investigación, Datos y Visualización de la Unidad Editorial y la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos de Madrid y es una apasionada del análisis de datos. Actualmente trabaja como independiente y es parte de la Asociación de Periodistas de Investigación de España.

Recent Articles

someone holding a climate change puzzle piece

The Global South Climate Database seeks to diversify expert voices on climate change in the media

Oct. 31 was the official launch of the Southern Hemisphere Climate Database, a tool created by Carbon Brief and the Oxford Climate Journalism Network. It seeks to support journalists in their work to diversify expert voices on climate change in the media.

a newspaper with the phrase fake news

Journalists of the Americas use collaboration as a weapon against disinformation

The 'Disarming Disinformation' series of master classes was held on Nov. 17 and 18. Craig Silverman (Propublica), Patricia Campos Mello (Folha de S. Paulo), Claire Wardle (Brown University), and Giannina Segnini (Columbia University) made up the 'dream team' of instructors. LatAm Journalism Review (LJR) attended the classes and presents a summary of the most important points discussed.

sound waves and a map from Venezuela in the backgroud

Closing of radio stations weakens conditions for practicing journalism in Venezuela

Venezuela has been subjected to a dismantling of its media ecosystem in recent decades. During the year 2022, at least 95 radio stations have been closed in the country, Zulia state being the most affected. These closures seriously undermine citizens' right to know and the conditions to practice journalism.

someone scrolling through social media

Social media violence is changing journalists’ personal and professional practices, according to study

Researchers Summer Harlow, Ryan Wallace and Lourdes Cueva Chacón published on Oct. 7 the research entitled “Digital (In)Security in Latin America: The Dimensions of Social Media Violence against the Press and Journalists’ Coping Strategies.” The study reveals that social media violence needs to be taken as seriously as offline/physical violence.

a gray-haired man wearing a gray suit and looking at the camera

‘This recognition is an antidote against the disqualifications and aggressions that we Mexican journalists face’: Javier Garza Ramos, 2022 Maria Moors Cabot Special Citation

On October 11, Mexican journalist Javier Garza Ramos received a Special Mention in the Maria Moors Cabot Award 2022. In this interview, he talks about his relationship with journalism, what it means to work in a country like Mexico and how ego can become a double-edged sword.

Two people talking on a stage

New generation of Latin American journalists receive awards for leadership and social impact

The One Young World organization awarded Daniel Villatoro from Guatemala and María Paulina Baena from Colombia with the Journalists of the Year 2022 award. LJR interviewed both journalists to learn about their impressions of the award, what it is like to do journalism from Latin America, and what is the current situation in their countries.

A map with arrows indicating migratory movement and images of journalists covering

Latin American journalists build bridges during the 5th International Conference on Migration and Development Journalism in Spain

The fifth edition of the International Conference on Migration and Development Journalism took place in the city of Merida, Spain on Oct. 5, 6 and 7, 2022. Journalists from all over the world gathered to talk about journalism and migration, as well as to build networks and develop ties of collaboration. LJR covered the event and summarizes outstanding presentations by Latin American journalists in attendance.

a laptop and a lupa

Open call for proposals to strengthen investigative journalism in Latin America, amid challenges

The Consortium to Support Independent Journalism in the Region (CAPIR) has a call for proposals to fund national and cross-border investigative journalism in several Latin American countries. LJR spoke with journalists who received support last year about their experiences and the difficulties they face when doing investigative journalism.

a chained hand holding a microphone. In the background the Cuban flag.

Wave of journalist resignations in Cuba due to State Security harassment

In the last two months, at least 12 Cuban journalists have decided to quit their jobs or leave the profession publicly as a result of the harassment they have suffered at the hands of Cuban State Security. These journalists have usually made their decisions public on social media.

a street sign with the name Harvard on it

Opportunities in U.S. universities and organizations have made a difference for Latin American journalists. Applications now open

From spending an academic year working on a journalism project to touring and learning from the best newsrooms in the United States, internships at U.S. universities and organizations have marked the professional lives of hundreds of Latin American journalists. Learn how to follow in their footsteps and apply.