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Katherine Pennacchio

Katherine Pennacchio is a Venezuelan journalist living in Spain. She has developed her career as part of media and non-governmental organizations. She co-founded Vendata.org, an innovative project for the liberation of information and publication of open data in Venezuela. She was also part of the team of the investigative journalism site, Armando.info, and of Runrun.es, where she participated in large-scale investigations such as the Panama Papers. Katherine has a master's degree in Investigative, Data and Visualization Journalism from the Editorial Unit and the Rey Juan Carlos University of Madrid. She currently works as a freelancer and is part of the Association of Investigative Journalists of Spain.
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Katherine Pennacchio es una periodista venezolana viviendo en España. Ella ha desarrollado su trayectoria entre medios de comunicación y organizaciones no gubernamentales. Co-fundó Vendata.org, un proyecto innovador de liberación de información y publicación de datos abiertos en Venezuela. También fue parte del equipo del portal especializado en periodismo de investigación, Armando.info y de Runrun.es, donde participó en investigaciones de envergadura como los Papeles de Panamá. Katherine tiene una maestría en Periodismo de Investigación, Datos y Visualización de la Unidad Editorial y la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos de Madrid. Actualmente trabaja como independiente y es parte de la Asociación de Periodistas de Investigación de España.

Recent Articles

Screen shot of a zoom call with participant faces on top and a map of the tip of South America in the bottom

Network of fact-checking trainers created to bridge the training gap in Latin American universities

The Argentine organization Chequeado, with the support of Google News Initiative, invited news organizations Verificado (from Mexico), Colombia Check (from Colombia), Convoca and Ojo Público (both from Peru) to form a 'Latin American network of fact-checking trainers' and thus make up for the lack of fact-checking-oriented courses in university journalism curricula in Latin America.

Woman holding her head down

Women journalists in authoritarian contexts face different challenges than their male colleagues when practicing journalism

Women journalists in Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua and El Salvador face misogynistic comments, threats to their physical integrity and their family environment, and violations of their privacy. In this article we learn about the experiences of women who have practiced journalism in these three countries.

A man, a woman and another man sit at a table with a laptop open on a table and a lamp on the left side.

The state of freedom of expression in Uruguay is on alert due to an increase in threats and restrictions

Although Uruguay has been considered a benchmark for freedom of expression, the eighth monitoring report by the Center for Archives and Access to Public Information (Cainfo) recorded a 40 percent increase over the previous year in cases of threats and restrictions on journalists. There has been an increase in the number of cases for the third consecutive year and regressive legal reforms in terms of human rights and freedom of expression.

Three young journalists from Colombia in segmented photos, a woman, a man, and a woman, all wearing glasses.

Journalism project seeks to strengthen the right of access to public information in the Colombian Caribbean

The Contratopedia Caribe, a specialized digital platform that follows the trail of public contracting in the Colombian Caribbean, held training sessions for students to introduce them to tools to access the Law of Access to Information based on the Constitution of Colombia. This project was motivated by the great vulnerabilities that exist in the right of access to public information in Colombia that affect journalism.

Strings of numbers one and zero as a waterfall

Competition celebrates the best of data journalism from Latin America and the world

Works from Argentina, Peru, Colombia and Brazil were shortlisted for the most prestigious data journalism awards among more than 600 candidates from 379 media outlets around the world. Latam Journalism Review interviewed the leaders of the Latin American projects featured in the 2022 Sigma Awards.

A woman and two men share ISOJ research award on stage

Researchers reflect on how artificial intelligence influences the generation and distribution of news and its ethical implications

The official research journal of the International Online Journalism Symposium (ISOJ) presented in a panel the peer-reviewed official research publications about artificial intelligence (AI) and its growing interconnection with news and journalism.

four young women podcasters speaking on microphones in zoom

Women take on role of protagonists in podcasting industry in Spanish

On March 5, the second edition of PodWoman was held, a podcasting event in Spanish dedicated to women. LatAm Journalism Review (LJR) covered the event and spoke with audio and gender experts to analyze the importance of spaces like these.

mujer hablando al micrófono con fondo verde en un festival

Covering women's sexual and reproductive rights in Latin America after recent landmark cases

The recent decriminalization of abortion in Latin America has once again opened the conversation on the importance of appropriate media coverage when dealing with issues of sexual and reproductive rights. We spoke with several feminist journalists from the region to learn about the challenges they faced when covering these issues in their countries.

Portraits of available mentors for women journalists through WINN platform

The WINN network mentorships provide a space of support and trust among Latin American women journalists

The WINN network of women journalists offers, since November 2021, free 30-minute online mentorships with highly experienced journalists. In this second attempt at a mentoring program, they have been successful in providing a space of support and, often, also a therapeutic space for young journalists from Latin America.

Woman looking at graph charts in art gallery.

Latin American journalism turns to art so stories using data make a greater impact on audiences

Latin American journalism increasingly merges data and art so stories will have a greater impact and reach different audiences. However, there is still a need for more journalists to delve into the visual aspect of their work and for more institutions to support artistic projects.