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Katherine Pennacchio

Katherine Pennacchio is a Venezuelan journalist living in Spain. She has developed her career as part of media and non-governmental organizations. She co-founded Vendata.org, an innovative project for the liberation of information and publication of open data in Venezuela. She was also part of the team of the investigative journalism site, Armando.info, and of Runrun.es, where she participated in large-scale investigations such as the Panama Papers. Katherine has a master's degree in Investigative, Data and Visualization Journalism from the Editorial Unit and the Rey Juan Carlos University of Madrid. She currently works as a freelancer and is part of the Association of Investigative Journalists of Spain.
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Katherine Pennacchio es una periodista venezolana viviendo en España. Ella ha desarrollado su trayectoria entre medios de comunicación y organizaciones no gubernamentales. Co-fundó Vendata.org, un proyecto innovador de liberación de información y publicación de datos abiertos en Venezuela. También fue parte del equipo del portal especializado en periodismo de investigación, Armando.info y de Runrun.es, donde participó en investigaciones de envergadura como los Papeles de Panamá. Katherine tiene una maestría en Periodismo de Investigación, Datos y Visualización de la Unidad Editorial y la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos de Madrid. Actualmente trabaja como independiente y es parte de la Asociación de Periodistas de Investigación de España.

Recent Articles

Featured WhatsApp forochat

Venezuelan media turn to forochats to maintain interaction with audiences and support them during the pandemic

In Venezuela, due to poor Internet service, and more recently, the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic, forochats have become a way to continue informing readers, support disadvantaged communities and find innovative ways to obtain financing.

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Latin American media seek to influence public debate and engage audience in U.S. by translating their journalism to English

In recent years, various digital media in Latin America, from Mexico to Chile, have decided to translate and create content in English as a way to reach new audiences and thus increase their profits. Although, sometimes that’s easier said than done.

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Mexican digital media outlet Serendipia works to balance in-depth data journalism and content creation for social networks

Serendipia, a small media outlet from Puebla, Mexico, is using social media platforms YouTube and TikTok to bring data journalism and promote access to information to readers.

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Infotrición brings the work of 15 fact-checking organizations to readers’ Internet browsers in attempt to debunk disinformation

For years, a virus has been spreading on the Internet and it seems to be increasingly contagious: false information. It does not matter if the context is a presidential campaign, social crisis or catastrophe, disinformation aims to spread. Social media, messaging services, and the web in general are plagued with false news. Over the last […]

Venezuelan flag in Boca

Venezuelan journalism reshapes its migration coverage through projects born from and for migrants

They are part of the 5.4 million refugees and migrants from Venezuela worldwide. But, they are also storytellers, and have found ways to create journalistic projects in their host countries to integrate, train or provide quality information to those who are going through migratory processes.

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Latin American journalists use collaboration and technology to unmask corruption and regain readers’ trust

Collaboration and reporting in a network, those are the words that could summarize the four days of the First Latin American Journalism Meeting to investigate Corruption from different points of view (ELPIC, for its acronym in Spanish). A virtual event that brought together journalists from Latin America and the world, it placed the global tentacles of corruption under the magnifying glass.

Fire in 2010 at El Ávila Mountain in Caracas, Venezuela

Venezuelan digital magazine analyzes 20 years of data on fires in protected areas despite government opacity

Despite a lack of a monitoring system for public fires in the country, the journalists at Venezuelan digital magazine Prodavinci put together a project mapping two decades of fires in the country's protected areas. They used satellite data from abroad and worked with academics for this data journalism project.