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Security and Safety

Posts Tagged ‘ Security and Safety ’

Periodistas, camarógrafos y medios de comunicación esperan

Honduran special prosecutor for protection of journalists is left without mandate to investigate murders

The only office that exists in Honduras to investigative violence against journalists and protect this vulnerable group is the FEPRODDHH, but it has only five prosecutors – all based in Tegucigalpa – without assigned investigators and without legal jurisdiction to investigate murders or assassinations.

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Law to enhance protection of Salvadoran journalists stuck in congress while attacks increase

In 2018, the Association of Journalists of El Salvador presented a draft bill for the protection of journalists. After almost three years, the effort was cut short. The initiative was archived when the ruling Nuevas Ideas party took control of the Legislative Assembly. The parties that resumed the discussion at the last minute hold each other responsible for the lack of approval.

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A protection plan for journalists in Guatemala that was dead on arrival

Exactly a decade ago, the government of Guatemala committed to creating a plan to protect press workers in the face of growing attacks. That happened in 2012 during a government favorable to the idea, yet all these years later, it still hasn’t been achieved. Some journalists point to a distrust between the government and the press as a source of the problem.

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A wave of attacks against journalists triggers calls for a protection mechanism in Bolivia

Like other countries in the region, discussions are already taking place in Bolivia to establish a protection mechanism for journalists that would limit violence against them. For now, the projects are confidential, but the violence against journalists that launched them is visible.

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More Latin American countries consider protection mechanisms for journalists; not every effort succeeds

As violence against journalists has increased in Latin America, several countries have created protection mechanisms designed to implement safety measures for journalists reporting attacks or threats against them.

Claudia Julieta Duque

‘This is a forced resignation in the face of a very serious situation’: Colombian journalist Claudia Duque after returning her protection scheme

When she found irregularities in the handling of her data, Colombian journalist Claudia Julieta Duque returned her protection mechanism. Duque denounced having since suffered at least two serious security incidents. She also condemned the lack of compliance by the part of the State with the precautionary measures granted to her by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR).

Photo of young woman in a puffy jacket with a microphone in front of photos of people killed in Ukraiine

Three South American journalists covering the war in Ukraine

An Argentine, a Chilean and a Brazilian share the challenges they have faced while covering the conflict from the front lines of this Eastern European country. A dangerous environment is not the only obstacle and challenge for journalists in Ukraine. The logistics of coverage have also been complex.

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How to stay safe while covering violent conflict in Latin America

Experts in the coverage of violent confrontations in Latin America warn of the need for comprehensive security training that involves the entire newsroom, from bosses to reporters.

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Covering violent conflict: For Latin American journalists, the challenge is in their own communities

Whether in Mexico or Ecuador, as in Colombia, Honduras or Nicaragua, the coverage of violence has posed new challenges for journalists, because the traditional concept of armed conflict is being challenged in the region. The diversity of armed groups also means broadening the definition of the term. It is not just regular security forces, such as armies or police, and paramilitary groups such as guerrillas, but it can also involve drug traffickers, gang members or private security forces.

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'How to report safely: Strategies for women journalists & their allies' now available as a self-directed online course

“How to report safely: Strategies for women journalists & their allies” is now available as a self-directed online coursethat can be taken through JournalismCourses.org, Knight Center’s online learning platform.