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Carolina de Assis

Carolina de Assis is a Brazilian journalist and researcher who lives in Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil. She holds a master's degree in Women’s and Gender Studies from the GEMMA Programme – Università di Bologna (Italy) / Universiteit Utrecht (The Netherlands) and has worked as an editor at Gênero e Número, a Brazilian digital magazine focused on data journalism and gender issues. She is especially interested in journalistic initiatives aimed at promoting human rights and gender justice. You can find her on Twitter: @caroldeassis
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Carolina de Assis es una periodista e investigadora brasileña que vive en Juiz de Fora, MG, Brasil . Tiene una maestría en Estudios de las Mujeres y de Género del programa GEMMA – Università di Bologna (Italia) / Universiteit Utrecht (Holanda). Trabajó como editora en la revista digital brasileña Gênero e Número. Le interesan especialmente iniciativas periodísticas que tienen el objetivo de promover los derechos humanos y la justicia de género. Puedes encontrarla en Twitter: @caroldeassis.
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Carolina de Assis é uma jornalista e pesquisadora brasileira que vive em Juiz de Fora (MG). É mestra em Estudos da Mulher e de Gênero pelo programa GEMMA – Università di Bologna (Itália) / Universiteit Utrecht (Holanda). Trabalhou como editora na revista digital Gênero e Número e se interessa especialmente por iniciativas jornalísticas que promovam os direitos humanos e a justiça de gênero. Você pode encontrá-la no Twitter em @caroldeassis.

Recent Articles

Artwork with Knight Center logo and a portrait of a woman with a white shirt smiling

'Journalism is not a place for a single truth': 5 questions for Brazilian journalist Fabiana Moraes

Brazilian journalist Fabiana Moraes has in recent years honed her sharp critique of the coverage of Brazilian politics and society. She talked to LatAm Journalism Review about her new book, "A pauta é uma arma de combate" [The article is a combat weapon], in which she proposes a subjective journalism and talks about "how journalism can oppose scenarios of the destruction of people’s humanity."

A group of journalists on a stage surrounding a woman speaking on a microphone

Central American Network of Journalists emerges as a collective response to attacks on the press in the region

Faced with the recent escalation of attacks on freedoms of the press and expression in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua, journalists from these countries have come together to create the Red Centroamericana de Periodistas [Central American Network of Journalists]. Guatemalan Marielos Monzón, one of the Network’s founders, spoke to LatAm Journalism Review (LJR) about the goals and lines of work of this initiative in defense of journalism and the citizens’ right to be informed.

Person typing code on a laptop with a book on Python by their side

Coda.Br data journalism conference returns in hybrid format and celebrates 50 years of Philip Meyer's 'precision journalism'

The seventh edition of the Brazilian Conference on Data Journalism and Digital Methods - Coda.Br, which runs from Oct. 31st to Nov. 6th, will once again have a face-to-face event in São Paulo. The conference will include people from around the world who want to follow panels and workshops online, as a celebration of the legacy of American journalist Philip Meyer, who coined the term "precision journalism" to designate the work with data in the profession.

Sumauma tree seen from below

Sumaúma wants to 'amazonize the world' by doing journalism with a 'nature-based view': An interview with Brazilian journalist Eliane Brum

A tree thought of as the "queen of the Amazon," the “sumaúma” or kapok tree is one of the symbols of this tropical forest that covers a large part of South America. This icon of Amazonian magnificence gives its name to a journalistic project that publishes feature stories and articles in Portuguese, Spanish, and English. Its goal is to amplify the voices of the forest and "to refocus the world," as Eliane Brum, one of the founders of Sumaúma, said in an interview with LatAm Journalism Review (LJR).

one person standing and two people sitting and chatting in front of a mural written "a party of stories for curious minds" in spanish

Gabo Festival returns to face-to-face format and debuts in Bogotá, Colombia, celebrating 40 years of García Márquez's Nobel Prize

On Oct. 21, 2022, Bogotá, the capital of Colombia, will host for the first time the Gabo Festival, which resumes face-to-face after two years of online editions due to the Covid-19 pandemic. On the same day 40 years ago, Gabriel García Márquez was announced as the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. His acceptance speech "The Loneliness of Latin America" inspired the tenth edition of the Festival, which bills itself as an event for "storytellers."

Ajor's team gathered at a classroom with a screen with Ajor's logo behind them

Ajor reaches 100 members with focus on sustainability of Brazilian digital journalism

Just over a year after being founded by a group of 30 Brazilian news organizations, the Digital Journalism Association (Ajor) recently surpassed the 100-member mark, an achievement for the entity dedicated to strengthening digital journalism in Brazil. The growth of the association highlights the diversity of the sector in the country, which Ajor intends to help be recognized also for its economic importance.

Guatemalan journalists talk about the worsening of press freedom: 'A campaign of hunting, harassment and violence'

The arrest of José Rubén Zamora, journalist, founder and president of elPeriódico newspaper in Guatemala, has drawn international attention to the worsening of press freedom and the right to information in Guatemala. Journalists interviewed by LatAm Journalism Review (LJR) said that the arrest of one of the best-known names in Guatemalan journalism is a serious development in the escalation of attacks against the press critical of President Alejandro Giammattei's administration.

Knight Center marks 20th anniversary celebrating impact of its programs around the world

On Aug. 31, 2002, a seminar sponsored by the then nascent Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas took place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This marked the Center's first step on its path to supporting journalism in Latin America and the Caribbean, as established at its inception. Twenty years later, the Knight Center celebrated the expansion of its initial mission to strengthen global journalism with a special seminar at the University of Texas at Austin.

Organization of American States' flag

Center for Media Integrity of the Americas, an OAS initiative, wants to invest in journalists to strengthen democracy

Aware that widespread disinformation and threats to press freedom pose threats to democracy, the General Secretariat of the Organization of American States (OAS) launched the Center for Media Integrity of the Americas. This center intends to hold training seminars and conferences and offer grants to encourage the production of journalistic investigations. John Feeley, executive director of the new Center, spoke to the LatAm Journalism Review about the initiative.

'Journalism should be a tool for social transformation': 5 questions for Mexican journalist Laura Castellanos

For Mexican journalist Laura Castellanos, "it is vital that Latin American journalism become aware of its responsibility to cover, with a feminist perspective, the crisis that is tearing the region apart in terms of our civilization and the globe.” She is one of the winners of the Maria Moors Cabot 2022 award and talked about her work covering structural violence in her country in an interview with LatAm Journalism Review.