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Carlos Dada

Carlos Dada: Investigating power and criminality as democracy backslides in El Salvador

Carlos Dada and his team at El Faro have illuminated the dark corners of his country and surrounding region since he co-founded the outlet — the first digital-only media initiative in Latin America — with entrepreneur Jorge Simán in 1998. For doing so, they have drawn the ire of an increasingly authoritarian Salvadoran government.

Person typing code on a laptop with a book on Python by their side

Coda.Br data journalism conference returns in hybrid format and celebrates 50 years of Philip Meyer's 'precision journalism'

The seventh edition of the Brazilian Conference on Data Journalism and Digital Methods - Coda.Br, which runs from Oct. 31st to Nov. 6th, will once again have a face-to-face event in São Paulo. The conference will include people from around the world who want to follow panels and workshops online, as a celebration of the legacy of American journalist Philip Meyer, who coined the term "precision journalism" to designate the work with data in the profession.

Projeto Querino mostra como a história com um olhar afrocentrado explica o Brasil de hoje. Na foto, Rogero entrevista Vania Guerra, descendente de africanos escravizados e líder de uma comunidade quilombola no litoral do Rio de Janeiro. Foto: cortesia Angelica Paula/Projeto Querino

Podcast Querino Project celebrates Black protagonism in Brazilian history and reaches over 800 thousand downloads

In addition to the podcast, the Querino Project has a series of feature articles published in the Piauí magazine. More than 40 professionals worked for two years and eight months on the research and production. Inspired by the New York Times' Project 1619, Querino brings an Afro-centric look at the history of Brazil to contribute to the understanding of the country's current political and social challenges.

someone scrolling through social media

Social media violence is changing journalists’ personal and professional practices, according to study

Researchers Summer Harlow, Ryan Wallace and Lourdes Cueva Chacón published on Oct. 7 the research entitled “Digital (In)Security in Latin America: The Dimensions of Social Media Violence against the Press and Journalists’ Coping Strategies.” The study reveals that social media violence needs to be taken as seriously as offline/physical violence.

Member of the Mexican Army in front of a background of computer text

Military forces behind new cases of spying on Mexican journalists, reveals 'Ejército Espía' investigation

A forensic and journalistic investigation found evidence of spying with Pegasus spyware against journalist Ricardo Raphael and a colleague from Animal Político by the Mexican Army, an institution that has seen its power grow considerably during the López Obrador administration.

Disarming Disinformation FEATURED IMAGE

Journalists investigating the money behind disinformation invited to apply for master class series

In partnership with the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas is offering a master class series for journalists based in Latin America, the U.S. and Canada. All classes will be available in English, Portuguese and Spanish.

Sumauma tree seen from below

Sumaúma wants to 'amazonize the world' by doing journalism with a 'nature-based view': An interview with Brazilian journalist Eliane Brum

A tree thought of as the "queen of the Amazon," the “sumaúma” or kapok tree is one of the symbols of this tropical forest that covers a large part of South America. This icon of Amazonian magnificence gives its name to a journalistic project that publishes feature stories and articles in Portuguese, Spanish, and English. Its goal is to amplify the voices of the forest and "to refocus the world," as Eliane Brum, one of the founders of Sumaúma, said in an interview with LatAm Journalism Review (LJR).

A hacked mobile phone with a voice recorder and a keyboard in the background

For Mexican journalists, President López Obrador’s pledge to curb spyware rings hollow

Ending illegal surveillance of journalists and activists was one of Andrés Manuel López Obrador's promises after he became president of Mexico in 2018. Four years later, new evidence of spying on journalists is emerging, while journalists and NGOs believe that the president has little to show for his promises.

a gray-haired man wearing a gray suit and looking at the camera

‘This recognition is an antidote against the disqualifications and aggressions that we Mexican journalists face’: Javier Garza Ramos, 2022 Maria Moors Cabot Special Citation

On October 11, Mexican journalist Javier Garza Ramos received a Special Mention in the Maria Moors Cabot Award 2022. In this interview, he talks about his relationship with journalism, what it means to work in a country like Mexico and how ego can become a double-edged sword.

How to cover the climate crisis - and fight disinformation

MOOCs on covering the climate crisis attract more than 3,800 and can now be taken at anytime, from anywhere

A recent multilingual course on covering the climate crisis is now available as a self-directed course after reaching 3,810 students from 151 countries. Check out our self-directed course in English, Spanish or Portuguese, today!

Two people talking on a stage

New generation of Latin American journalists receive awards for leadership and social impact

The One Young World organization awarded Daniel Villatoro from Guatemala and María Paulina Baena from Colombia with the Journalists of the Year 2022 award. LJR interviewed both journalists to learn about their impressions of the award, what it is like to do journalism from Latin America, and what is the current situation in their countries.

person standing at an airport and staring at an airplane in the sky

Forced out: Latin America's investigative reporters pushed into exile

Voces del Sur reports that 170 journalists from the region were forced into exile in 2020 and 2021 to escape arbitrary imprisonment or even assassination attempts. To understand this worrying exodus, GIJN spoke with exiled members of the press from Nicaragua, El Salvador, Cuba, and Colombia, who shared how they had been pushed into exile, and gave tips for other watchdog journalists who face similar threats.