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Violence Against Journalists

Mexican journalist Anabel Hernández

‘The (Mexican) government is not interested in defending journalists, we are a hindrance to them’: 5 questions for Anabel Hernández

Mexican investigative reporter Anabel Hernández believes the mechanism for protecting journalists will never work well while impunity in crimes against journalists persists. And yet, Mexico’s president has not relinquished a discourse of hostility and intimidation towards the press.

Israel Silva, Jairo de Sousa e Gleydson Carvalho: jornalistas assassinados são tema de documentário sobre violência contra comunicadores no Brasil. Crédito: Boca Fechada

Murder of journalists in Brazil: documentary shows recurrent violence in small towns

Brazilian documentary 'Boca Fechada' (Gagged) starts from the stories of three journalists killed by gunmen. The film shows the vulnerability of journalists with a critical voice in small towns in the interior of the country.

Pancarta por justicia en el asesinato del periodista Juan Carlos Muñiz.

Journalists and national and international organizations cry out for justice after the seventh murder of a journalist in Mexico in 2022

Journalist Juan Carlos Muñiz was murdered in Zacatecas on March 4. Organizations such as RSF, Article 19 and the IAPA, as well as journalists from Mexico and abroad, called for Mexican authorities to stop the violence against journalists.

Illustration of a shootout on the street and reporters covering it

How to stay safe while covering violent conflict in Latin America

Experts in the coverage of violent confrontations in Latin America warn of the need for comprehensive security training that involves the entire newsroom, from bosses to reporters.

Woman journalist photographing in risky situation

Multilingual webinar and free self-directed courses help women journalists and allies fight threats and violence

To help raise awareness for the threats women journalists face around the world, and promote concrete solutions, the Knight Center, International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF) and UNESCO are jointly organizing a free, multilingual webinar on International Women’s Day, March 8 at 10 a.m. U.S. Central Time.

Photos of murdered Mexican journalists scattered on the ground during a protest

‘Structural flaws’ hamper the effectiveness of mechanisms to protect journalists in Brazil, Colombia, Honduras, and Mexico, points out RSF

A report by Reporters Without Borders found “serious problems that require urgent changes” in the mechanisms for protecting journalists in these four countries, which account for 90% of the murders of journalists perpetrated in Latin America in the last ten years.

Bullet hole in glass

Latin American journalists covering violent conflicts in their own countries grapple with uncertainty and ever-changing dynamics

Stories about gangs and criminal organizations, border areas with the ambiguity of their limits and jurisdictions, marginal urban towns or a simple central plaza of a city taken over by drug cartels are some of the Latin American topics and scenarios where journalists of the region can find their best reports or a life or death situation.

Periodistas asesinados

Who were the journalists murdered in Mexico so far this year?

The journalists who were victims of the wave of violence at the beginning of 2022 have common denominators such as being independent or working on their own native digital projects on local issues of politics, insecurity and corruption.

AMLO showing Loret's alleged income figures

Mexico’s president reveals journalist's income and the public reacts in unprecedented ways on social media

After López Obrador revealed what journalist Carlos Loret de Mola allegedly earns in a year, more than 64 thousand people joined a Twitter Space in which the actions of the president and the growing violence against the press in Mexico were condemned. To date, more than 1.5 million people have listened to the audio recording.

Illustration of a journalist crouching down

Covering violent conflict: For Latin American journalists, the challenge is in their own communities

Whether in Mexico or Ecuador, as in Colombia, Honduras or Nicaragua, the coverage of violence has posed new challenges for journalists, because the traditional concept of armed conflict is being challenged in the region. The diversity of armed groups also means broadening the definition of the term. It is not just regular security forces, such as armies or police, and paramilitary groups such as guerrillas, but it can also involve drug traffickers, gang members or private security forces.