texas-moody

Violence Against Journalists

Claudia Julieta Duque

‘This is a forced resignation in the face of a very serious situation’: Colombian journalist Claudia Duque after returning her protection scheme

When she found irregularities in the handling of her data, Colombian journalist Claudia Julieta Duque returned her protection mechanism. Duque denounced having since suffered at least two serious security incidents. She also condemned the lack of compliance by the part of the State with the precautionary measures granted to her by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR).

Illustration showing women reporters

Black and Indigenous journalists are attacked online when they take a stand against racism

A data journalism study by several news organizations found that Black and Indigenous women in Brazil, in addition to being targets of misogyny and gender violence, face additional attacks online when they speak out against racism.

Researchers and journalists discuss report during webinar

State actors were the main perpetrators of violence against women journalists in Brazil in 2021, according to Abraji

Monitoring carried out by the Brazilian Association of Investigative Journalism (Abraji) recorded 119 cases of gender violence against journalists in 2021 in Brazil. Of these, in 58 cases state authorities were involved – Brazil’s President, Jair Bolsonaro, took part in eight of these attacks. The survey highlights the special vulnerability of women journalists dedicated to the political editorial section, since 60% of the attacks were motivated by coverage of this topic.

Mexican journalist Anabel Hernández

‘The (Mexican) government is not interested in defending journalists, we are a hindrance to them’: 5 questions for Anabel Hernández

Mexican investigative reporter Anabel Hernández believes the mechanism for protecting journalists will never work well while impunity in crimes against journalists persists. And yet, Mexico’s president has not relinquished a discourse of hostility and intimidation towards the press.

Israel Silva, Jairo de Sousa e Gleydson Carvalho: jornalistas assassinados são tema de documentário sobre violência contra comunicadores no Brasil. Crédito: Boca Fechada

Murder of journalists in Brazil: documentary shows recurrent violence in small towns

Brazilian documentary 'Boca Fechada' (Gagged) starts from the stories of three journalists killed by gunmen. The film shows the vulnerability of journalists with a critical voice in small towns in the interior of the country.

Pancarta por justicia en el asesinato del periodista Juan Carlos Muñiz.

Journalists and national and international organizations cry out for justice after the seventh murder of a journalist in Mexico in 2022

Journalist Juan Carlos Muñiz was murdered in Zacatecas on March 4. Organizations such as RSF, Article 19 and the IAPA, as well as journalists from Mexico and abroad, called for Mexican authorities to stop the violence against journalists.

Illustration of a shootout on the street and reporters covering it

How to stay safe while covering violent conflict in Latin America

Experts in the coverage of violent confrontations in Latin America warn of the need for comprehensive security training that involves the entire newsroom, from bosses to reporters.

Woman journalist photographing in risky situation

Multilingual webinar and free self-directed courses help women journalists and allies fight threats and violence

To help raise awareness for the threats women journalists face around the world, and promote concrete solutions, the Knight Center, International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF) and UNESCO are jointly organizing a free, multilingual webinar on International Women’s Day, March 8 at 10 a.m. U.S. Central Time.

Photos of murdered Mexican journalists scattered on the ground during a protest

‘Structural flaws’ hamper the effectiveness of mechanisms to protect journalists in Brazil, Colombia, Honduras, and Mexico, points out RSF

A report by Reporters Without Borders found “serious problems that require urgent changes” in the mechanisms for protecting journalists in these four countries, which account for 90% of the murders of journalists perpetrated in Latin America in the last ten years.

Bullet hole in glass

Latin American journalists covering violent conflicts in their own countries grapple with uncertainty and ever-changing dynamics

Stories about gangs and criminal organizations, border areas with the ambiguity of their limits and jurisdictions, marginal urban towns or a simple central plaza of a city taken over by drug cartels are some of the Latin American topics and scenarios where journalists of the region can find their best reports or a life or death situation.