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Violence Against Journalists

Posts Tagged ‘ Violence Against Journalists ’

Rafael Soares, a journalist with brown hair and a beard, seen in the newsroom of O Globo and Extra newspapers, holding a notepad

‘It takes brutal courage’: How Rafael Soares specialized in covering police violence in Rio de Janeiro

Covering executions committed by police officers, how former members of the force become professional killers, and how they form organizations comparable to the mafia: this is the specialty of Rafael Soares, a 32-year-old reporter from the newspapers O Globo and Extra who says he does not feel fear. After the podcast "Pistoleiros," he has just released his first book, "Milicianos."

Hombre con traje negro y camisa de rayas mirando a la cámara sonriendo en un fondo claro

‘It’s a complex region, but with a very vibrant press’: Carlos Lauría, executive director-elect of the Inter American Press Association

Argentine journalist Carlos Lauría will take over as executive director of the Inter American Press Association on Nov. 12. In an interview with LJR, he spoke about the challenges that lie ahead and his goals in supporting press freedom and media empowerment in the region.

Mexican Journalist Alejandra Xanic with a background of gold medals and a red brochure.

2023 Cabot Prize Winner Alejandra Xanic: Digital violence, smear campaigns among main challenges for Mexican journalists today

Despite physical and digital violence, polarization and verbal attacks by people in power that Mexican journalists currently face, 2023 Cabot Prize award winner Alejandra Xanic told LJR not to give in to fear. Rather, she advised evaluating risks and carrying out collaborations to continue doing investigative journalism.

A man with glasses stands at a podium with a United States flag to the left and the ISOJ 2023 sign on podium

Journalists call on organizations, lawmakers to support reporters in exile, ISOJ audience hears

Journalists who have experienced exile around the world gathered at the International Symposium of Online Journalism (ISOJ) in Austin on April 15 to talk about how they continue to report on their home countries and what they need from lawmakers, nonprofits, and citizens to support them.

Cover pages of newspapers from the North of Mexico with a map of the U.S.-Mexico border as a background.

Women reporters from northern Mexico share experiences on how to do investigative journalism amidst violence and job insecurity

In the panel "How to investigate corruption in the north of Mexico," part of the festival "Contra el Olvido [Against forgetting]," in the state of Tamaulipas, journalists Melva Frutos, Ana Victoria Félix, Priscila Cárdenas, and Shalma Castillo told how they face threats, lack of resources and indifference from society in their attempt to do investigative reporting on violence and corruption.

A jornalista hondurenha

Honduran investigative journalist Jennifer Avila wins Gabo 2023 Award for Excellence in Journalism

Honduran investigative journalist Jennifer Ávila — reporter, editorial director, and co-founder of Contracorriente — was the winner of the Recognition of Excellence category of the Gabo Award 2023, becoming the first journalist from her country to receive the honor, the Gabo Foundation announced Monday morning.

Mexican pesos notes with a blurred background of a crime scene

How to achieve sustainability in at-risk environments? Two Mexican independent news outlets implement innovative strategies together with businesses

Investigative news outlets Revista Espejo and Red Es Poder, located in Mexico's high-crime states, have produced journalistic content for businesses and paid coverage of events as alternative sources of income. This has helped compensate for a lack of advertising resulting from brands' fear of advertising in news outlets that cover insecurity or corruption.

The confined president: Outgoing Colombian president Iván Duque's relationship with the press

In FLIP's analysis, the government of Iván Duque, which ends on August 7, maintained a strategy of friend-or-foe with the press. With those considered critical, distrust and secrecy prevailed. In addition, he used human and economic resources to prioritize institutional communication and impose his narrative. This contributed to an atmosphere of polarization and built a wall that affected access to information.

Illustration of someone holding a panic button

More Latin American countries consider protection mechanisms for journalists; not every effort succeeds

As violence against journalists has increased in Latin America, several countries have created protection mechanisms designed to implement safety measures for journalists reporting attacks or threats against them.

Mexican journalist Anabel Hernández

‘The (Mexican) government is not interested in defending journalists, we are a hindrance to them’: 5 questions for Anabel Hernández

Mexican investigative reporter Anabel Hernández believes the mechanism for protecting journalists will never work well while impunity in crimes against journalists persists. And yet, Mexico’s president has not relinquished a discourse of hostility and intimidation towards the press.