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Press Freedom

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'What we journalists have to confront the most at the moment is people’s distrust,' says leader of Peruvian journalists' association

The president of the National Association of Journalists of Peru, Zuliana Lainez, talked about the current situation of independent journalism in Latin America, the persistent judicial harassment against the press, and the current crisis of confidence in the media in Peru.

Two men, one with a notebook and the other one with a camera, walk towards the camera at a border crossing in South America

Media on the Brazil-Bolivia border: Journalistic collaboration and service to the local community

Journalists from Bolivia and Brazil talk about their collaboration while covering drug trafficking and migration on the border between the two countries. LJR also interviewed Diário Corumbaense from the Brazilian border city of Corumbá to report on the news service it provides to the inhabitants of its local community.

CPJ report on press freedom situation in Ecuador reveals ‘an unsettling crisis’

On June 28, the Committee to Protect Journalists presented its report "Ecuador on edge: Political paralysis and spiking crime pose new threats to press freedom," which describes the current crisis facing journalism in the country.

Cuba flag and mallet justice

4 things you should know about Cuba's new Social Communication Law

The Cuban regime signed into law a bill that seeks to regulate the media ecosystem on the island and to continue restricting freedom of expression of independent news outlets. LatAm Journalism Review (LJR) summarizes the four most important points regarding the approval of this new social communication law.

José Rubén Zamora

Press freedom organizations condemn sentence of Guatemalan journalist José Rubén Zamora, voice concerns about other open court cases

In view of the six-year prison sentence against journalist José Rubén Zamora for the alleged crime of money laundering, international and national organizations voiced their concern for the general situation of journalists in Guatemala, the weakening of its democracy, and for Zamora himself, who has at least two other open court cases against him.

Journalists protesting censorship

Meet the journalists defying a widening crackdown on press freedom in Guatemala

After the arrest of José Rúben Zamora and the closure of elPeriódico — the newspaper he founded and ran —, several news outlets are defying government pressure and working together on investigations and fact-checking in Guatemala. Four journalists tell us how they continue to defend independent journalism in the country.

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Dictatorships in South America: The challenges of reporting today on the recent past

Several decades have passed since the last dictatorial regimes were established in the Southern Cone of Latin America. Human rights defenders and a journalist talk about the challenges of reporting on the recent past, and why it is important to continue doing so.

Panoramic view of the Peruvian Congress

Pending vote on 'Gag Law,' Peru's Congress goes on the offensive against press freedom and media react

Peru's parliamentarians launched various attacks to restrict press freedom, and journalist associations are resisting as best they can. A controversial bill may fail in Congress, but other threatening initiatives remain under discussion, reflecting deteriorating democratic conditions in the country.

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In ‘a blow to journalism,’ Guatemala’s elPériódico announces closure

After almost 27 years of life, Guatemalan newspaper elPeriódico announced its closure amid complaints of persecution by the government. Its president and founder has served almost 10 months in prison after being arrested on heavily criticized charges.

'We left El Salvador so we could continue in El Salvador': How El Faro decided to move its management to Costa Rica

El Salvador's most acclaimed newspaper relocated its administrative and legal departments to Costa Rica, due to harassment and government surveillance. However, its journalists remain in the country. Co-founder Carlos Dada told LJR how the move allows them to continue doing their investigative work, while expressing concerns over authoritarianism and potential criminalization of journalists.