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Science Journalism

Posts Tagged ‘ Science Journalism ’

Panelists of the COVID-19 webinar

Reporters and scientists point out how to improve coverage of COVID-19 in global webinar by Knight Center, UNESCO and WHO

Panelists at the webinar "Variants, vaccines and medications: What journalists need to know to improve COVID-19 coverage" discussed some key points that journalists covering the coronavirus need to address to better tell their stories.

Covering COVID-19 in the Global South

How journalists can avoid 'the hype' when covering COVID-19 developments in Latin America

In Latin America, the pandemic exacerbated a complex phenomenon that involves many actors and has numerous sources: the excessive promotion and exaggeration –in newspaper articles or announcements by governments and scientific institutes– of the importance or potential value of a clinical trial, treatment, medicine or area of science in particular. This article explains how to avoid falling into these distortions that can lead to the erosion of social trust in science.

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Science journalism course in Portuguese now available to be taken anytime, from anywhere in the world

“Science Journalism: From pandemic to climate crisis, how to improve science coverage,” is now available as a self-directed course on the Knight Center’s online learning platform, JournalismCourses.org.

Covers of the KSJ science editing handbooks in English, Spanish and Portuguese

Brazilian version of KSJ’s handbook on science journalism editing is now available for free download from Knight Center

A new resource is available to Portuguese speaking journalists and editors seeking guidance on how to cover and question scientific topics. The Science Editing Handbook, originally published in English by the MIT’s Knight Science Journalism Program, is now available in a Brazilian edition, translated and adapted by a group of science journalists.

Cover of the Science Editing Handbook in Portuguese

Brazilian edition of science editing handbook for journalists will be launched during webinar

Brazilian journalists will now have an important resource for reporting and editing science journalism. On Friday, Nov. 5, the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas and the Serrapilheira Institute, of Brazil, will publish the Portuguese translation of the KSJ Science Editing Handbook during a special webinar.

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Science Journalism: Take this free online course in Portuguese to learn how to improve your coverage of the pandemic, climate crisis and much more

The Knight Center and the Brazilian Serrapilheira Institute are teaming up to offer a free online course in Portuguese, “Science Journalism: From pandemic to climate crisis, how to improve science coverage.” 

Gloved hands holding vaccine vial and needle

Knight Center webinar convenes global experts to discuss COVID-19 vaccines coverage, science & distribution

“For the past year, journalists from around the world have found themselves covering the biggest story of their lifetime. A global immunization effort is now underway, and journalists are now challenged and given the opportunity to cover the multidimensional aspects of the vaccine."

Scientist at a microscope

Brazilian tool born out of the pandemic curates scientists’ social media posts for journalists 

Science Pulse is a social listening tool aimed at helping journalists to get the best out of the scientific community on Twitter and Facebook

A photo of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest

Pulitzer Center seeks South American fellows to cover deforestation of the Amazon rainforest

A new fellowship program aims to recruit investigative journalists in South America to cover this vast area and one of the biggest stories of our lifetime: the destruction of the world’s rainforests.

Sabine Righetti, 38, and Ana Paula Morales, 35 (right) (Photo: Bori/Marcelo Justo)

Brazilian journalists create platform to connect scientists and the press

Despite the large number of scientific studies published each day in Brazil, finding the people behind the research can be a great challenge, and getting them to talk an even bigger one.