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Gender and Diversity

Stories of Indigenous and Black populations in Latin America must be told in their own voices, journalists said in panel about diversity

Given the narratives of hate and the invisibilization that Indigenous, Afro-descendant and Black communities suffer in Latin America, journalists must give them a voice, know their realities and avoid their re-victimization, Diana Manzo, Indhira Suero and Edilma Prada, members of the first panel of the 2nd Latin American Conference on Diversity in Journalism, said.

Session de Cierre 2a Conferencia Latinoamericana sobre Diversidad en el Periodismo

What's next? Some ideas for boosting diversity in journalism in Latin America

The closing session of the Second Latin American Conference on Diversity in Journalism took stock of the ideas discussed during the event and planted the seed for the creation of a future continental organization to promote the concepts of diversity, equity, and inclusion in journalism in Latin America.

The human impact of the lack of diversity in Brazilian newsrooms

In Brazil, where 43.2% of the population identifies as white and 55.7% as Black, newsrooms are composed of 77% white employees. Research shows that a lack of diversity affects news production and journalists themselves.

Women in Paraguay holding protest signs, cameras and microphones pointed towards them, night time

Paraguayan women journalists and female media workers denounce sexual and labor harassment at Grupo Albavisión

The Paraguayan Union of Journalists and press collectives are defending the rights of the country's women journalists and female media workers to report harassment in the newsroom and not be fired as a result, which has been the case recently.

Woman holding a megaphone

Mexican university offers training in investigative journalism with a gender perspective

Investigative journalism often uncovers illegalities and injustices and contributes to the securing of and access to rights. In the case of gender inequalities, investigative journalism also plays a crucial role. A university in Mexico seeks to fill the gap in training on this topic through an online course in investigative journalism with a gender perspective.

LGBT pride flag

Tips for a more responsible coverage of LGBTI+ issues in Brazil

The movement to give more focus and increase the visibility of LGBTI+ issues is important, but journalists must be careful not to reproduce misinformation or stigmatize groups that have historically been vulnerable and silenced. Camilla Figueiredo, co-founder of the independent, non-profit organization Agência Diadorim, in Brazil, talks about best practices in content production and in the search for specialized sources on the subject.

Woman talking at a speaker during feminist march

How the 'Ni Una Menos' movement was a watershed in the coverage of gender issues in Argentina

The social movement created in 2015 after a case of femicide that shocked Argentina also caused profound changes in journalism in the country: “gender editor” roles were created in several news outlets and the approach to themes related to diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) was strengthened.

Woman holding her head down

Women journalists in authoritarian contexts face different challenges than their male colleagues when practicing journalism

Women journalists in Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua and El Salvador face misogynistic comments, threats to their physical integrity and their family environment, and violations of their privacy. In this article we learn about the experiences of women who have practiced journalism in these three countries.

‘If journalism itself does not acknowledge Indigenous journalists, discrimination will continue’: 5 questions for Edilma Prada, founder and managing editor of Agenda Propia from Colombia

Edilma Prada, a Colombian journalist who’s the founder and managing editor of Agenda Propia, participated in the "5 questions for" section of LatAm Journalism Review (LJR). She talked about her news outlet’s achievements, the situation of press freedom in Colombia for Indigenous journalists, and the need for Colombian journalists not to forget to also cover peacetime stories.

As nove pessoas da equipe do projeto Acessibilidade Jornalística, de pé, ao ar livre

Brazilian independent media launch research and journalistic content application for the visually impaired

The Brazilian project “Journalistic accessibility: a problem that no one sees” addressed the demands of visually impaired people in order to improve their access to quality information. It surveyed people who are blind or have low vision and analyzed 21 journalistic websites. Based on that, Lume was created, an application that curates journalistic content aimed at the visually impaired. This initiative aims to broaden the understanding of diversity and inclusion in journalism.